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http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docId=5249518974978628334&hl=en
This is an amazing dog. Of course, I think they all are.

A great clip from the Hill Country Reporter taken from http://users3.ev1.net/%7Eabraxox/Skidboot.html and uploaded here cause it is smaller and google rocks.

"The artist’s dilemma and the meditator’s are, in a deep sense, equivalent.
Both are repeatedly willing to confront an unknown and to risk a response
that they cannot predict or control. Both are disciplined in skills that
allow them to remain focused on their task and to express their response in
a way that will illuminate the dilemma they share with others. And both are
liable to similar outcomes. The artist’s work is prone to be derivative, a
variation on the style of a great master or established school. The
meditator’s response might tend to be dogmatic, a variation on the words of
a hallowed tradition or revered teacher. There is nothing wrong with such
responses. But we recognize their secondary nature, their failure to reach
the peaks of primary imaginative creation. Great Art and Great Dharma both
give rise to something that has never quite been imagined before. Artist and
meditator alike ultimately aspire to an original act."

–Stephen Batchelor, Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, Vol. IV, #2

 This is from Molly Gordon who I enjoy.  I’m going to try the victim/player exercise with a situation I’m experiencing now.

"Unpack the gifts of failure as you review the year past and plan for the year ahead.

How do you respond to failure? How do you feel when you realize you’ve made an error of judgment or violated your own standards?

Personally,
I hate it. And nothing irritates me more than a happy-talking,
self-appointed New Age pundit who’s getting rich telling me that
everything is perfect and failure doesn’t hurt.

Bull. Failure
hurts. I ought to know. I’ve failed at business, love, and living up to
my own ethics. I’ve failed as a sister, a daughter, a wife, and a
coach. And not all of these failures are in the distant past. There are
some doozies from times more recent than I care to mention.

Still,
I do claim there are gifts in failure. In fact, I’m pretty passionate
about this because I figure that anything that hurts as much as failure
darn well better have an up-side.

A few years back I
single-handedly destroyed the motherboard on a perfectly good computer
by (wo)man-handling a new memory chip into a slot I couldn’t quite
reach. I’d installed memory before and I knew what it should feel like.
I asked myself again and again if I shouldn’t just maybe stop rather
than forcing something that was designed to slip in easily. Impatience
won the day, and after spending $300 for attempted repairs, I replaced
the computer.

At that time I didn’t have money to burn (still
don’t, in fact). Yet I’d been working on right livelihood for a long
time, and I somehow realized that this time I simply could not afford
to take a nose-dive into a bottomless pit of guilt. (As the oldest of
eight children, raised Catholic in a military family, my guilt pit
truly is bottomless. I’ll match it against yours any day.)

So I
decided to reframe the "waste" of money as a lesson. Since the amount
involved was sizable in my world, I further resolved that this lesson
needed to be fully worth the cost. With this in mind, I arrived at the
following resolutions:<!–
D(["mb","

\r\n \r\n

1.\r\nFrom this moment forth I will stop pretending that I can\’t afford to\r\nhave professionals maintain my equipment. After all, my do-it-yourself\r\nproject had a four-figure price tag.

\r\n \r\n

2. From this moment forth I\r\nwill measure the intensity of my impatience against my willingness to\r\nincur a four-figure expense. If giving into my impulse is worth\r\nfour-figures, I\’ll go for it. Otherwise, I shall forbear.

\r\n \r\n

3.\r\nFrom this moment forth I will celebrate my failures and set-backs by\r\nnoting the degree of resilience, humor, and humility required to go\r\nwith the flow.

\r\n \r\n

4. From this moment forth I will respond to guilt\r\nby acknowledging my errors and rectifying them as simply, cleanly, and\r\nquickly as I can. From now on, I\’m staying out of the pit.

\r\n \r\n

This\r\nwas a pivotal moment in the development of my business. From that point\r\nforward I lived those resolutions to the best of my ability, not to\r\npush away embarrassment, guilt, or disappointment, but to use these\r\ndiscomforts as the fuel for growth. Something in me stands taller,\r\nbreathes deeper, speaks more clearly as a result. I may not like\r\neverything I do, but I know longer have to run away from myself. That\r\nmeans I always have a place to stay, ground to stand on, and for me,\r\nthat is a huge part of authenticity.

\r\n \r\n

The brilliant economist and\r\nbusiness consultant Fred Kofman teaches an exercise you can use to\r\nexperience the kind of shift I described above. I\’ll summarize it\r\nbriefly here, but you really owe it to yourself to get Fred\’s tapes, Conscious Business.\r\n\r\nThe set is $40.77 (with free shipping) from Amazon, and I promise you\r\nthat it is worth a hundred times that. One reader wrote me, "My wife\r\nsays this is worth $4 million if it works." He ordered the tape series\r\nand reported back that I had undersold it.

\r\n \r\n

Fred calls this\r\na Victim/Player exercise. Write your answers to the victim questions,\r\nthen take some time to notice where these questions take you. What mood\r\ndo they leave you in? What attitudes or beliefs arise? What options are\r\nyou left with for moving on? Then read and answer the player questions.\r\nAgain, notice where these questions take you. How is this different\r\nfrom what you experienced as a victim?”,1]
);
//–>

1.
From this moment forth I will stop pretending that I can’t afford to
have professionals maintain my equipment. After all, my do-it-yourself
project had a four-figure price tag.

2. From this moment forth I
will measure the intensity of my impatience against my willingness to
incur a four-figure expense. If giving into my impulse is worth
four-figures, I’ll go for it. Otherwise, I shall forbear.

3.
From this moment forth I will celebrate my failures and set-backs by
noting the degree of resilience, humor, and humility required to go
with the flow.

4. From this moment forth I will respond to guilt
by acknowledging my errors and rectifying them as simply, cleanly, and
quickly as I can. From now on, I’m staying out of the pit.

This
was a pivotal moment in the development of my business. From that point
forward I lived those resolutions to the best of my ability, not to
push away embarrassment, guilt, or disappointment, but to use these
discomforts as the fuel for growth. Something in me stands taller,
breathes deeper, speaks more clearly as a result. I may not like
everything I do, but I know longer have to run away from myself. That
means I always have a place to stay, ground to stand on, and for me,
that is a huge part of authenticity.

The brilliant economist and
business consultant Fred Kofman teaches an exercise you can use to
experience the kind of shift I described above. I’ll summarize it
briefly here, but you really owe it to yourself to get Fred’s tapes, Conscious Business.

The set is $40.77 (with free shipping) from Amazon, and I promise you
that it is worth a hundred times that. One reader wrote me, "My wife
says this is worth $4 million if it works." He ordered the tape series
and reported back that I had undersold it.

Fred calls this
a Victim/Player exercise. Write your answers to the victim questions,
then take some time to notice where these questions take you. What mood
do they leave you in? What attitudes or beliefs arise? What options are
you left with for moving on? Then read and answer the player questions.
Again, notice where these questions take you. How is this different
from what you experienced as a victim?<!–
D(["mb","

\r\n \r\n

Victim Questions
1. What happened to you?
2. Who wronged you? How?
3. What should they have done?
4. What should they do now to fix it?
5. What punishment do they deserve?

\r\n \r\n

Player Questions
1. What challenge did you face?
2. How did you respond?
3. What did not work?
4. Could you have done something better or with more integrity?
5. Could you have prepared better (to minimize the risk or limit the impact)?\r\n
6. Can you do something now to improve the situation?
7. What lesson can you learn from the experience?

\r\n \r\n

Fred\r\nis careful to point out that the feelings that show up when we are\r\nvictims are real for us. This exercise, then, is not about invalidating\r\nyour experience. It is, however, a pointed invitation to accept your\r\nfeelings and then stand back from them so that you (your values, your\r\nintentions, your aspirations), and not your reactions, can steer your\r\ncourse.

“,1]
);
D([“mb”,”\r\n


Robin Scanlon
scanlon@eyeoftheislands.com
808.597.8068\r\n\r\n“,0]
);
D([“ce”]);
//–>

Victim Questions
1. What happened to you?
2. Who wronged you? How?
3. What should they have done?
4. What should they do now to fix it?
5. What punishment do they deserve?

Player Questions
1. What challenge did you face?
2. How did you respond?
3. What did not work?
4. Could you have done something better or with more integrity?
5. Could you have prepared better (to minimize the risk or limit the impact)?

6. Can you do something now to improve the situation?
7. What lesson can you learn from the experience?

Fred
is careful to point out that the feelings that show up when we are
victims are real for us. This exercise, then, is not about invalidating
your experience. It is, however, a pointed invitation to accept your
feelings and then stand back from them so that you (your values, your
intentions, your aspirations), and not your reactions, can steer your
course."

Do you remember when being a geek was a negative thing?  You couldn’t admit that you sat around trying new hardware and software, implementing systems, reading (??!!??).  You would be labeled a geek.  Now it’s a good thing…a cool thing to be.  Why?  Geeks are making a lot of money…somewhere…not in this house. 

I’ve always been a closet geek and I’m proud to be out now.  Here’s a site to order geek wear…say it loud…I’m a geek and I’m proud.  http://www.thinkgeek.com/tshirts/generic/

It’s taken a while to get back to bloggin’. 

I got back from the Bahamas on a Sunday night and left for a fine art photography workshop on Monday morning.  The workshop was intense combining reviews of students’ portfolios and location shooting.  John Paul Caponigro teaches several workshops, some technical and some to help photographic artists along their journey.  My first John Paul class was a Master Photoshop class at UH’s Pacific New Media.  He taught Photoshop, but also explored different ways of seeing.  It was not your average Photoshop class for sure. 

I knew I wanted more and signed up for his class called Inner Vision at the Maine Photographic Workshop.  That was the summer of 2001 and began my love affair with Maine.  Since that summer, I’ve taken a John Paul workshop every summer.  He’s helped me refine my portfolio to two bodies of work – abstracts and dogs.

Last year I talked John Paul into doing his workshop in Hawaii…not for me, but to share the beauty of the islands with the other workshop participants.  Many of them have become friends that I know I’ll have for life.

Kathy Beal is one of those special people and she came to stay with us for a few days after the workshop.  It was a magical time as I got to share my favorite places with her.  It helped me figure out that I loved Oahu above all the other Hawaiian islands.  We went to Yokohama Beach on the west shore with the most beautiful clear, blue water.  Because of the current that crosses the beach, the water is never cloudy.  The sand is course so it doesn’t stick to you, but is very easy on your feet.  Sunsets at this beach are spectacular.

We had lunch at the Contemporary Museum Café the following day.  The museum, set in lush, green Makiki Valley, is five minutes from our office.  Going there is like a mini-vacation, on oasis in this metropolis.  Lunches are also excellent. I love the soba noodle salad and almost any of their specials.

The North Shore is a special place and Kris and I often ride up there just to have burgers at Kua Aina, in spite of the fact that they opened a location in town.  The drive along the coast on the Windward Side is full of breathtaking views of the ocean.  Haleiwa is a charming old town with surf shops and small restaurants.  There’s a MacDonalds on the edge of town, but you hardly notice it.  They weren’t allowed to put up their trademark giant golden arches.  Kathy and I had Kua Aina’s great burgers.

Sherwood Forest is an unlikely name for a beach in Hawaii, but it’s one of my favorites.  It’s named for the groves of Ironwood trees along the beach.  Ocean is turquoise and sand is fine and white with a view of Rabbit Island and the Mokuluas.  This is a local beach…very few tourists know about it and you can’t see it from the main road.

Dim Sum is one of favorite lunches and Mei Sum has the best on the island.  It’s the best dim sum I’ve had outside of Chinatown in LA.  There’s nothing special about the restaurant except the bean curd roll (filled with pork and vegetables), half moon (with shrimp and vegetables), sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaves, turnip cakes, chicken and mushroom dumplings flavored with ginger.  Don’t go here if you’re on a diet.

One night we took Kathy to Tokkuri-tei.  It was a twenty minute wait, but well worth it.  Santa (one of the owners) takes great care of us as we are regulars.  It’s always the restaurant we go to when we’re in town.  Five pages of items makes the menu a fun read.  Karei karaage (whole deep fried flounder), ika yaki (a yummy squid pancake), horenso tamagotoji (spinach in a tasty broth), yaki udon (stir-fried udon noodles with vegetables, shrimp, and pork)….yum, yum, yum.

Gotta go….it’s 8 o’ clock and we haven’t eaten yet.  Writing this is making me wicked hungry.